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Posted by Sofia Ashdown on December 7, 2016

Publishing on Kindle — Feeding Fussy

  A couple of months ago, I began to get curious about Kindle. Is it really as easy as it seems? Could I just bash out a Word document and upload it — voilà! — to Amazon?   Yes and no.   Obviously, you’ve got to write the darn thing. Luckily, Kindle books don’t need to

Posted by Sofia Ashdown on December 6, 2016

How to be Happy – Lessons from Philosophy Part One: Epicurus

Can philosophy teach us about happiness? In this series, I will be introducing a handful of interesting philosophers and their succeeding schools of thought. Each figure has something to say about the role and achievement of happiness in human life. Happiness is a goal we all cherish, but many of us struggle to define it,

Posted by Sofia Ashdown on December 6, 2016

How to be Happy — Lessons from Philosophy Part Two: Montaigne

Part One of this series examined the ideas of Epicurus. Perhaps you have taken his advice and you are now reading this in the countryside somewhere, living a self-sustained and philosophical life with a bunch of good friends — or perhaps not. Either way, the French nobleman and philosopher Michel de Montaigne, has some advice

Posted by Sofia Ashdown on December 6, 2016

How to be Happy – Lessons from Philosophy Part Three: Buddhism

In this series, we are exploring the value of certain philosophical ideas, in a bid to uncover the secrets of happiness. So far, we have learnt that the sociable and self-sufficient Epicurus believed we needed friendship, freedom, and self-analysis to achieve happiness, whereas Montaigne emphasised the importance of embracing both our rational and animalistic selves.

Posted by Sofia Ashdown on December 6, 2016

How to be Happy — Lessons from Philosophy Part 4: Man’s Search for Meaning

There are few places more horrific in this world than the Nazi concentration camps. Readers of philosophy may feel that any advice on happiness only applies to those living in normal conditions. After all, how can one be happy whilst starving, being abused, or imprisoned? These philosophers, what do they know of suffering?   Arguments